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Special Rules

Castling

Castling is a move in the game of chess involving a player's king and either of the player's original rooks. It is the only move in chess in which a player moves two pieces in the same move, and it is the only move aside from the knight's move where a piece can be said to "jump over" another.

Castling consists of moving the king two squares towards a rook on the player's first rank, then moving the rook to the square over which the king crossed. Castling is technically a king move.

Castling can be done on either side of the board. Castling can either be done on the king-side (also known as castling short) or on the queen-side (also known as castling long).

Castling may only be done if:

  1. The king has never moved.
  2. The rook involved has never moved.
  3. The squares between the king and the rook involved are unoccupied.
  4. The king is not in check.
  5. The king does not cross over or end on a square in which it would be in check.
Lyctc. A chess castling move (Dominio público)                                

Promotion

Promotion is a chess rule that a pawn that reaches its eighth rank is immediately changed into the player's choice of a queen, knight,rook, or bishop of the same color. The new piece replaces the pawn on the same square, as part of the same move. The choice of new piece is not limited to pieces that have already been captured; it is legal for promotion to result in a player controlling, for example, two Queens of the same color despite starting the game with one. Promotion is immediate and mandatory for any pawn that reaches its eighth rank. 

The majority of promotions are to a queen. Promotion to a queen is often referred to as queening. A promotion to a  other piece (not a a queen) is called underpromotion.

 

Pictures created with https://www.ajedrezeureka.com/creador-de-diagramas-de-ajedrez/

En Passant

En passant  is a special pawn capture, that can only occur immediately after a pawn moves two ranks forward from its starting position and an enemy pawn could have captured it had the pawn moved only one square forward. Note that the capturing pawn must be on its fifth rank prior to executing this maneuver. The opponent captures the just-moved pawn "as it passes" through the first square. The resulting position is the same as if the pawn had moved only one square forward and the enemy pawn had captured it normally.

The en passant capture must be made at the very next turn or the right to do so is lost. It is the only occasion in chess in which a piece is captured but is not replaced on its square by the capturing piece. Like any other move, if an en passant capture is the only legal move available, it must be made. 

Santiago Pastrana Álvarez. Ajedrez animación en passant.gif (GNU/GPL)

Draw

In chess, a draw is the result of a game ending in a tie. Usually, in tournaments a draw is worth a half point to each player, while a win is worth one point to the victor and none to the loser.

A draw occurs when it appears that neither side will win. Draws are codified by various rules of chess including

  • stalemate (when the player to move has no legal move and is not in check)

  • threefold repetition (when the same position occurs three times with the same player to move)

  • the fifty-move rule (when the last fifty successive moves made by both players contain no capture or pawn move).

  • when neither player has sufficient material to checkmate the opponent or when no sequence of legal moves can lead to checkmate.

Unless specific tournament rules forbid it, players may agree to a draw at any time.

Check and Checkmate

The goal in chess is to capture (or checkmate) the opponent's king. That is why all players have to protect their kings. If an opponent's piece is threatening to capture the king, the king is said to be 'in check'.  It is illegal to move the king onto a square where it would be under attack (in check). If the king is in check, the king's owner must do something to protect the king right away.

To protect the king, the player may try the following three defenses:

  1. move the king to a square where the king is not threatened

  2. block the line of attack (if the attack is not by a knight or a pawn)

  3. capture the opponent's piece that is attacking the king

If none of the the above 3 defenses work, the king is not just 'under check' -- such king is said to be checkmated.

With checkmate, the game is over. 

If you want, you can learn different types of checkmate, stalemate, and how to checkmate your opponents fast. Just go to this website and learn how to checkmate really fast

https://www.ragchess.com/how-to-checkmate-your-opponent/

Chess rules questions

Question

What is castling?

Answers

Castling is the only move in chess in which a player moves two pieces in the same move.

Castling is the only move in chess in which a player change a pawn into a queen.

Question

Can you play chess with two queens of the same color at the same time?

Answers

It is impossible. That is draw.

Yes, you can by promotion.

Question

Can you do a castling if the king is in check?

Answers

You can only to protect the king.

You can not do that.

Question

Can you promote a rook?

Answers

Not, you can only promote a pawn.

Yes, you can do it if this rook reaches the eighth rank.

Question

What is en passant rule?

Answers

En passant  is a special pawn capture, that can only occur immediately after a pawn moves two ranks forward from its starting position and an enemy pawn could have captured it had the pawn moved only one square forward.

En passant  is a special pawn capture, that can only occur after a pawn moves two ranks forward from its starting position and an enemy pawn could have captured it had the pawn moved only one square forward.

Question

What is a stalemate?

Answers

It is a situation when the player to move has no legal move and is in check.

It is a situation when the player to move has no legal move and is not in check.

Question

When does a draw occur?

Answers

A draw occurs when it appears that neither side will win.

A draw occurs when both players are bored of playing chess.

Question

Is the game over with checkmate?

Answers

No, the game is over just with check.

Yes, the game is over with checkmate.

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